Uncertainty and adaptability: be optimistic but not complacent

Since writing to families at the start of the holidays it seems uncertainty and adaptability may be the norm for some time yet.

I hope my message in Assembly last week is of interest; both to share aspects of our students’ school experience and for the wider relevance to you and your family.

'Welcome to Term 3. I hope you are all well and were able to enjoy the good weather, before restrictions and winter combined to dampen spirits somewhat.

'Whether you are at school, or a Year 10 student working from home, I hope you have much to look forward to this term. Indeed, Year 10s may appreciate not having to travel, although I imagine you prefer being at school if you can.

'There are a few comments I’d like to make today which take the form of suggestions, with a common theme of balance and perspective.

'While not dismissing the challenges we face individually, as members of families, within our various groups of friends, our communities and our community at Carey, I encourage you to avoid dwelling on the negative impact of changes we have had to make, or the uncertainty faced by so many.

'Please understand there will be times when each of us will feel stressed and challenged and that different things will trigger those feelings for each of us. 

'Don’t underestimate the important role we can all play in supporting each other or the importance of being conscious of the way others are feeling. 

'Challenging as things may seem for us in Melbourne just now, the situation is not dire and some overseas cities and countries have recovered from circumstances worse than ours. 

'Nevertheless, we mustn’t be complacent and must recognise that the rate at which COVID–19 cases reduces, or indeed whether numbers continue to rise as they are in the USA and other countries, depends on how all in Melbourne behave in the coming weeks. It really is critical we maintain physical distancing and related hygiene routines at school and elsewhere.

'I would like to encourage you all to be well informed. Being well informed includes being discerning about the sources of information we use. Fake news is a reality, hopefully not so much here as it is in some countries. Misinformation and ill-informed opinion is readily communicated and it is important to be discerning about what we trust.

'In conclusion, to paraphrase the ‘be alert but not alarmed’ message which you may be familiar with: I encourage us all to be optimistic but not complacent and to look out for each other collectively and individually.

'Thanks, and all the best for a great term.'

Graeme Young
Acting Head of Senior School

Category: